Works
Overview

In Sosa's hands, the tree of life becomes a nimbus of thoughts or obsession, as each woman mentally bears her hopes and fears like a crown of glory.  -- John Mendelsohn

            In each work of art there is a world. Secreted within each visual presence is the life of a whole culture and its history. To enter a work of art is to share a fresh vision of how a people sees itself at a specific moment in time.

            For Kathy Sosa, this sense of art as a dynamic portal is made clear in three major series of paintings and prints that draw upon the rich cultural heritage of Mesoamerica. The series share an intensity of vivid color and design motifs drawn from  textiles, traditional garments, and sculptural objects created by indigenous peoples. In much of Sosa's work are recurring images of women - vibrant, strong, and beautiful.

            In Huipiles, Sosa's paintings focus on the traditional blouses of Mayan peoples of southern Mexico and Guatemala, and the women who wear them. The huipil is a woven and embroidered garment, with many distinctive forms. Each region and village has its own patterns and individual women create their own personal interpretations as well. The ancient tradition of the huipil is kept alive today by those who continue to make and wear these blouses in their everyday lives in Latin America as well as the U.S.-born women who collect and wear them as an act of cultural pride and personal style.

            In Sosa's paintings, women sit or stand looking directly at us, in formal portrait poses. At the same time, they appear open and relaxed as their brilliant garments are echoed by the collaged fabrics or digitally printed patterns that serve as an encompassing backdrop. The effect is to be immersed in a decorative tide of color and design that surrounds the figures and floods our visual field.

            In Sosa's series Found Objects, she concentrates on the woven textiles alone. Garments have been digitally scanned, manipulated, and enhanced with paint, glaze, or gilt. The result is a group of rectangles of saturated color that emphasize the abstract qualities and symmetry of the original floral designs. The greatly enlarged images, up to 60"x90", capture the woven threads with remarkable verisimilitude.

            In the series Trees of Life, Sosa has reinterpreted a folk art form from Mexico as a kind of headdress for individual women. The traditional tree of life often incorporated figures of Adam and Eve, grandparents and parents, and a bride and groom, joining generations in a spiritual lineage that links heaven and earth. In Sosa's hands, the tree of life becomes a nimbus of thoughts or obsession, as each woman mentally bears her hopes and fears like a crown of glory. These paintings are like icons, in which the personal merges with a sense of one's place in the great chain of life.

                                                                                  --  John Mendelsohn

Video
Biography

In 2007 Sosa began to explore the artistic expression of mestisaje, the blending of peoples, races, ethnicities, languages, ideas, habits and cultures that characterizes the Texas-Mexico border region that has been her home since childhood.

Katherine Sosa is an independent marketing, political design consultant and artist. She was the only woman on George W. Bush's gubernatorial race in 1998, his presidential campaign in 2000 and re-election bid in 2004. Her creative work has earned national awards for advertising excellence in both television & print. Current clients include Texas Dow Employees Credit Union, Public Service Credit Union, and Sul Ross University.

Prior to forming Sosa Consultation & Design with her husband, Lionel, Kathy served as president of Garcia•LKS, the Southwest's largest independent Hispanic ad agency, which she founded as KJN in 1987.

In her over twenty years in marketing, most of them as an ad agency principal and entrepreneur, Kathy has worn a number of hats, among them strategist, planner, creative director and copywriter. In addition to commercial advertising experience on accounts from Dr Pepper and Mexicana Airlines to Sî TV and Budweiser, she is experienced in both education-related marketing, public service communications, and is a veteran of over 25 political media campaigns.

Kathy holds bachelors and masters degrees in political science, both from St. Mary's university in San Antonio. With education an important focus for Kathy, she currently serves on the Generation Texas Board of Directors. She was appointed by former Governor George W. Bush to the Children's Trust Fund of Texas Council, and by Governor Rick Perry to the Founding Board of The Texas Conference for Women. Kathy was named by Inc. magazine as an Entrepreneur of the Year.

A renowned artist, Kathy was commissioned by the Texas Women's Conference to do a portrait of keynote speaker Martha Stewart, to whom the artist personally presented the work. In 2007 Sosa began to explore the artistic expression of mestisaje, the blending of peoples, races, ethnicities, languages, ideas, habits and cultures that characterizes the Texas-Mexico border region that has been her home since childhood. She received national recognition for the result of that passion, the traveling exhibition "Huipiles: a Celebration," which debuted at the Mexican Cultural Institute in Washington, D.C. as part of the Smithsonian Latino Center's 2007 summer season "Mexico at the Smithsonian" before traveling to the Museo Alameda in San Antonio in 2008. 2009 saw Sosa's one woman show at San Antonio's Blue Star Contemporary Art Space. Currently, she exhibits New York City and Tulsa. Her work has been featured on CNN, in FiberArts Magazine, in Skirt!  San Antonio Woman, Country LifestyleDestinations, and is available in San Antonio through AnArte Gallery and the Regalo Gift Gallery at the Museo Alameda. She is also represented by galleries in Boerne, Texas and Charlotte, North Carolina.

Most recently, Kathy, and her husband Lionel Sosa, created and produced the critically-acclaimed documentary titled "Children of the Revolución - How the Mexican Revolution Changed America's Destiny," a 20-part storytelling series which chronicles never-before-told American history of the Texas/Mexico borderland.

Exhibitions
Video