Works
Overview

After many years as a practitioner of graphic design; including having his own design firm in New York City, Michel now dedicates himself exclusively to pursuing his life long interest in drawing, printmaking and sculpture.

Michel Goldberg: born in Paris, France is a graduate of The Pratt Institute and the High School of Music and Art in New York City. He worked for Will Burtin, one of the foremost information designers of the 20th Century, in graphic and exhibition design and for Clarke & Way (The Thistle Press) in limited editions and fine binding. He was a member of the faculty at The Pratt Institute where he taught Graphic Design and Visual Communications.

After many years as a practitioner of graphic design; including having his own design firm in New York City, Michel now dedicates himself exclusively to pursuing his life long interest in drawing, printmaking and sculpture.

He has exhibited in various shows in New York City, New York State,and Florida including The Longboat Key Center for the Arts. He was on the faculty of the Longboat Key Center for the Arts- a division of The Ringling College of Art & Design were he taught printmaking.

His drawings, monotypes and sculptures were exhibited in a one-man show at the Brik Gallery in 2007 and his work is included in private collections.

 

Biography

 Monotype printmaking is his principal vehicle for the visceral exploration into the mysterious world of black and white. 

Michel Goldberg born in Paris, France came to the United States as a boy in 1949 and attended the prestigious High School of Music and Art in New York City. He holds Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Pratt Institute majoring in Graphic Design and Visual Communications.

 

Michel worked in graphic and exhibition design for Will Burtin, a 20th Century international pioneer in the field of information design. A highlight was being involved in the 1964-65 World’s Fair in Queens NY, working on exhibitions in the Kodak Pavilion. Michel was encouraged by Will Burtin to join the faculty at Pratt Institute where he taught for six years and developed a course in graphic design and visual communications for the Advertising Design Department and in the graduate department of the School of Art Education. He was also an instructor in a scholarship program for gifted high school students offered by the New York City Board of Education and Pratt Institute. 

 

Michel moved to Clarke & Way (The Thistle Press) specialists in limited editions and fine bindings, where he was exposed to the disciplines of Monotype setting and Letterpress printing. He developed an appreciation for fine printing and fine papers which was formative in his development as a graphic designer.

 

He opened his design studio in 1962 working on visual communications needs for a variety of clients; including corporations, foundations, fund-raising development campaigns, trade associations, arts organizations, museums, schools and colleges. Michel received awards over the years from the Metropolitan Printing Association, the American Association of Fund Raising Development, the Champion Paper and Mohawk Paper companies. In addition, the Strathmore Paper company selected certain of his designs for inclusion in the company’s permanent library of design. 

 

A poster designed by Michel “Stations an Endangered Species” commissioned by the National Endowment of the Arts in 1974 was selected for publication in “Images of an Era: The American Poster 1945-1975” which accompanied the exhibition shown in several European Cities during The Bicentennial Year 1976/77 under the auspices of the Smithsonian Institution.

 

Michel’s studio was selected by the United States Information Agency to create their first Design Manual to be used in all overseas offices. 

 

In 1981, Michel founded Signal International, Inc. a design firm specializing in corporate identity, architectural graphics and signage. The firm worked with a major architectural firms, real estate developers, educational and cultural institutions. After closing Signal in 1992, Michel continued to work as a graphic design consultant and in particular, valued his long relationship with the Jewish Theological Seminary of America for whom he developed many important facsimile folios of rare Judaic manuscripts from their library. 

 

After his many years as a graphic designer, while living in Florida for a period of time he was on the faculty of the Longboat Key Center for the Arts, a division of The Ringling College of Art and Design, where he taught printmaking and started sculpting in stone. 

 

On returning to New York, he pursued his interest in sculpture enrolling in the welding program at the Art Students League in NYC exploring a new medium and creating a body of work in steel. He was selected on several occasions to submit proposals for a site-specific sculpture for the “Model to Monument: Public Art in Public Spaces” program in NYC.

 

A long-time resident of Freehold, NY, Michel now dedicates himself to his lifelong interest in drawing, printmaking and sculpture. Monotype printmaking is his principal vehicle for the visceral exploration into the mysterious world of black and white. 

 

His drawings, monotypes and sculptures have been exhibited in various shows including at The Art Students League in NYC, galleries in the Hudson Valley and Florida and in private collections. 

 

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